Where are they now? Supreme Court clerks, OT 2008

Following up on posts on a ten-year retrospective on the Supreme Court clerks from October Term 2003, October Term 2004, October Term 2005, October Term 2006, and October Term 2007, here's what the clerks from October Term 2008 are doing. This list is probably unreliable and has not been fact-checked in any way, except for the links provided (and these links admittedly often aren't the best source material). As always, please let me know of any errors or corrections.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts

William P. Baude (Yale 2007 / McConnell), law professor at Chicago

Jeffrey M. Harris (Harvard 2006 / Sentelle / Silberman), partner at Consovoy McCarthy Park

Erin E. Murphy (Georgetown 2006 / Sykes), partner at Kirkland & Ellis

Porter N. Wilkinson (Virginia 2007 / Kavanaugh), chief of staff to regents of the Smithsonian

 

Justice John Paul Stevens

Jessica Bulman-Pozen (Yale 2007 / Garland), law professor at Columbia

Cecilia M. Klingele (Wisconsin 2005 / Black / Crabb (W.D. Wis.)), law professor at Wisconsin

Lindsey Powell (Stanford 2007 / Garland), DOJ

A. Damian Williams (Yale 2007 / Garland), AUSA, S.D.N.Y.

 

Justice Antonin Scalia

Jameson R. Jones (Stanford 2007 / Sutton), partner at Bartlit Beck

Yaakov M. Roth (Harvard 2007 / Boudin), partner at Jones Day

Moshe Y. Spinowitz (Harvard 2006 / Boudin), partner at Skadden

David C. Thompson (Stanford 2007 / Kozinski), general counsel & chief privacy officer, Grand Rounds

 

Justice Anthony Kennedy

Ashley C. Keller (Chicago 2007 / Posner), partner at Keller Lenkner

Travis D. Lenkner (Kansas 2005 / Kavanaugh), partner at Keller Lenkner

Steven M. Shepard (Yale 2007 / Kozinski), partner at Susman Godfrey

Christopher J. Walker (Stanford 2006 / Kozinski), professor at Ohio State

Justice David H. Souter

Erin F. Delaney (NYU 2007 / Calabresi), professor at Northwestern

Michael Gerber (Yale 2005 / Leval), AUSA, S.D.N.Y.

Warren D. Postman (Harvard 2007 / W. Fletcher), partner at Keller Lenkner

Noah Purcell (Harvard 2007 / Tatel), Solicitor General of Washington

Justice Clarence Thomas

William S. Consovoy (George Mason 2001 / E. Jones), partner at Consovoy McCarthy Park

Claire J. Evans (Rutgers-Camden 2002 / Sentelle / Chertoff / Simandle (D.N.J.)), partner at Wiley Rein

Jennifer L. Mascott (George Washington 2006 / Kavanaugh), professor at George Mason

Patrick N. Strawbridge (Creighton 2004 / H. Dana (Maine) / M. Arnold), partner at Consovoy McCarthy Park

 

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Sue-Yun Ahn (Columbia 2006 / Tatel / Cote (S.D.N.Y.)), senior counsel, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Miriam L. Seifter (Harvard 2007 / Garland), professor at Wisconsin

Kevin S. Schwartz (Yale 2006 / Calabresi), partner at Wachtell

Robert M. Yablon (Yale 2006 / W. Fletcher), professor at Wisconsin

Justice Stephen Breyer

Brianne J. Gorod (Yale 2005 / Katzmann / Rakoff (S.D.N.Y.)), chief counsel, Constitutional Accountability Center

Seth Grossman (Yale 2005 / Calabresi / Reinhardt), chief of staff to the President of the University of California

Aileen M. McGrath (Harvard 2007 / Boudin), deputy city attorney, City of San Francisco

Matthew E. Price (Harvard 2006 / Boudin), partner, Jenner & Block

Justice Samuel Alito

Dana Remus (Yale 2002 / Scirica), general counsel, Obama Foundation

Andy Oldham (Harvard 2005 / Sentelle), judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

Michael H. Park (Yale 2001 / Alito), partner at Consovoy McCarthy Park

Jack L. White (Pepperdine 2003 / Alito), partner at FH+H

 

Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

Isaac Lidsky (Harvard 2004 / Ambro, shared with Ginsburg), CEO, ODC Construction

This is by far the most close-knit class of clerks we’ve come across. To wit:

-Three teach at the University of Wisconsin, and two of them, Ginsburg co-clerks, are married to each other. (UPDATE: Two other clerks from OT08, Erin Delaney and Travis Lenkner, are also married to each other.)

-Two Thomas clerks, one Roberts clerk, and one Alito clerk are partners at a boutique founded by at least some of them.

-Two Kennedy and one Souter clerk are also partners at the same boutique founded by at least some of them.

Otherwise, it’s a typical mix of mostly law firm partners, public servants, (including a state SG and a federal appellate judge), and law professors.

Where are they now? Supreme Court clerks, OT 2007

Following up on posts on a ten-year retrospective on the Supreme Court clerks from October Term 2003, October Term 2004, October Term 2005, and October Term 2006, here's what the clerks from October Term 2007 are doing. This list is probably unreliable and has not been fact-checked in any way, except for the links provided (and these links often aren't the best source material).

Chief Justice John G. Roberts

Jason T. Burnette (Georgia 2006 / R. L. Anderson), partner at Jones Day

Joshua Hawley (Yale 2006 / McConnell), attorney general of Missouri

Anton Metlitsky (Harvard 2005 / Garland), partner at O'Melveny

Erin Morrow Hawley (Yale 2005 / Wilkinson), professor at Missouri

 

Justice John Paul Stevens

Todd Gluth (Berkeley 2005 / W. Fletcher), partner at Cooley

Sara Eisenberg (Cardozo 2005 / Lifland (D.N.J.) / Barry), deputy city attorney of San Francisco

Kate Shaw (Northwestern 2006 / Posner), professor at Cardozo

Abby Wright (Penn 2006 / Boudin), attorney, DOJ

 

Justice Antonin Scalia

Aditya Bamzai (Chicago 2004 / Sutton), professor at Virginia

John Bash (Harvard 2006 / Kavanaugh), associate counsel, White House (and nominee, U.S. Attorney, W.D. Tex.)

Bryan M. Killian (Harvard 2005 / Niemeyer), partner at Morgan Lewis

Rachel P. Kovner (Stanford 2006 / Wilkinson), assistant to the Solicitor General

 

Justice Anthony Kennedy

Michael Chu (Harvard 2006 / D. Ginsburg), partner at Kirkland & Ellis

Stephen J. Cowen (Chicago 2006 / D. Ginsburg), of counsel at Jones Day

Annie Kastanek (Northwestern 2005 / Ripple), AUSA, N.D. Ill.

C.J. Mahoney (Yale 2006 / Kozinski), partner at Williams & Connolly (and nominee, Deputy Trade Representative)

 

Justice David H. Souter

Bert Huang (Harvard 2003 / Boudin), professor at Columbia

Leslie C. Kendrick (Virginia 2006 / Wilkinson), professor at Virginia

Michael J. Mongan (Stanford 2006 / Garland), deputy solicitor general of California

Micah W.J. Smith (Harvard 2006 / Calabresi), AUSA, S.D.N.Y.

 

Justice Clarence Thomas

Eric McArthur (Chicago 2005 / Luttig), DAAG, DOJ

Carrie Severino (Harvard 2004 / Sentelle), chief counsel and policy director, Judicial Crisis Network

Heath Tarbert (Penn 2001 / D. Ginsburg), nominee, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for International Markets and Development

Leila Mongan (NYU 2005 / Sentelle / Lamberth), most recently counsel at Hogan Lovells

 

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruthanne M. Deutsch (Georgetown 2004 / Dyk), partner at Deutsch Hunt

Brian H. Fletcher (Harvard 2006 / Garland), assistant to the Solicitor General

Thomas G. Saunders (Yale 2004 / Leval), partner at WilmerHale

Zachary D. Tripp (Columbia 2005 / Kearse), assistant to the Solicitor General

 

Justice Stephen Breyer

Michael Bosworth (Yales 2003 / Katzmann / Kakoff), counsel at MacAndrews & Forbes

Karen Dunn (Yale 2006 / Garland), partner at Boies Schiller

Eric J. Feigin (Stanford 2005 / Wilkinson), assistant to the Solicitor General

Philippa M. Scarlett (Columbia 2003 / A. Williams), formerly DAAG in DOJ

 

Justice Samuel Alito

James Hunter (Yale 2003 / Alito), partner at Hunter & Kmiec

Geoffrey J. Michael (Yale 2000 / Alito), partner at Arnold & Porter

David H. Moore (BYU 1996 / Alito), general counsel, USAID

Jessica E. Phillips (Northwestern 2006 / Flaum), counsel at Boies Schiller

 

Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

Heidi Bond (Michigan 2006 / Kozinski, shared with Kennedy), author

 

A few thoughts:

Law professors continue to flow from a few justices. Only five law professors among the bunch, and they're spread out a bit more than previous years.

Plenty of government service. There were 15 involvement in government, and not all federal--service in Missouri, California, and San Francisco peppered the resumes of this class.

A small drop in law firms. There were 14 in law firms, down from 19 last year--and those were all partners. This year's includes several counsel & of counsel positions.

All in all, the sample size is consistently too small to draw much comparison from class to class or across classes. But it's worth looking back over the years to see if 10-year retrospectives have changed terribly much!

Update: I mixed up an OT 2008 Ginsburg clerk with an OT 2007 clerk; that has been corrected!

Where are they now? Supreme Court clerks, OT 2006

Following up on posts on a ten-year retrospective on the Supreme Court clerks from October Term 2003, October Term 2004, and October Term 2005, here's what the clerks from October Term 2006 are doing. This list is probably unreliable and has not been fact-checked in any way, except for the links provided (and these links often aren't the best source material).

Chief Justice John G. Roberts

Felicia H. Ellsworth (Chicago 2005 / Boudin), partner at WilmerHale

George W. Hicks, Jr. (Harvard 2005 / J.R. Brown), partner at Bancroft

Keenan D. Kmiec (Berkeley 2004 / Sentelle / Alito (3d Cir.)), partner at Hunter & Kmiec

Paul J. Nathanson (Harvard 2004 / Silberman / Niemeyer), AUSA, E.D. Va.

 

Justice John Paul Stevens

Nicholas J. Bagley (NYU 2005 / Tatel), professor at Michigan

Chad Golder (Yale 2005 / Garland), AUSA, E.D. Va.

Jamal Greene (Yale 2005 / Calabresi), professor at Columbia

Lauren Sudeall Lucas (Harvard 2005 / Reinhardt), professor at Georgia State

 

Justice Antonin Scalia

Daniel A. Bress (Virginia 2005 / Wilkinson), partner at Kirkland & Ellis

Louis A. Chaiten (Northwestern 1998 / Sutton), partner at Jones Day

Joshua S. Lipshutz (Stanford 2005 / Kozinski), partner at Gibson Dunn

Hashim Mooppan (Harvard 2005 / Luttig), partner at Jones Day

 

Justice Anthony Kennedy

David W. Foster (Harvard 2005 / Kozinski), partner at Skadden

Lisa Marshall Manheim (Yale 2005 / Leval), professor at University of Washington

Eric E. Murphy (Chicago 2005 / Wilkinson), Solicitor General of Ohio

Mark R. Yohalem (Harvard 2005 / Rymer), AUSA, C.D. Cal.

 

Justice David H. Souter

Boris Bershteyn (Yale 2004 / Cabranes), partner at Skadden

David S. Han (Harvard 2005 / Boudin), professor at Pepperdine

Bryan W. Leach (Yale 2005 / Cabranes), CEO at Ibotta

Daniel B. Tenny (Michigan 2005 / Tatel), civil division, appellate, DOJ

 

Justice Clarence Thomas

John D. Adams (Virginia 2003 / Sentelle), partner at McGuireWoods

David A. Bragdon (Virginia 2002 / S. Williams), AUSA, E.D.N.C.

Adam Conrad (Georgia 2005 / Sentelle), partner at King & Spalding

Brandt Leibe (Yale 2005 / Luttig), partner at King & Spalding

 

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Kate Andrias (Yale 2004 / Reinhardt), professor at Michigan

Scott Hershovitz (Yale 2004 / W. Fletcher), professor at Michigan

Daphna Renan (Yale 2004 / H. Edwards), professor at Harvard

Arun Subramanian (Columbia 2004 / Jacobs / G. Lynch (S.D.N.Y.)), partner at Susman Godfrey

 

Justice Stephen Breyer

Jaren Janghorbani (Columbia 2004 / Jacobs / K. Wood (S.D.N.Y.)), partner at Paul Weiss

Tacy F. Flint (Chicago 2004 / Posner), partner at Sidley

Stephen Shackelford (Harvard 2005 / Boudin), partner at Susman Godfrey

Thiru Vignarajah (Harvard 2005 / Calabresi), Deputy Attorney General of Maryland

 

Justice Samuel Alito

Michael S. Lee (BYU 1997 / Alito (3d Cir.) / Benson (D. Utah)), Senator from Utah

Christopher J. Paolella (Harvard 1999 / Alito (3d Cir.)), partner at Reich & Paolella

Matthew A. Schwartz (Columbia 2003 / Alito (3d Cir.)), partner at Sullivan & Cromwell

Gordon D. Todd (Virginia 2000 / Beam), partner at Sidley

 

Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

Justin Driver (Harvard 2004 / Garland), professor at Chicago

 

A few thoughts:

Law professors continue to flow from a few justices. Nine members of this class went on to be law professors, the same number as last year. Six of those came from two justices, Stevens and Ginsburg. (And it's worth noting that while Ginsburg placed three professors this year, it doesn't match the full four-professor slate from OT 2003!)

More partners, and more boutiques. There were 19 law firm partners this time. Last year, a number were in an "attorney" or "counsel" role, but that doesn't seem to be the case for this class. Additionally, two clerks (Kmiec and Paolella) went on to start their own boutiques.

A Senator! A CEO! That's right, Senator Mike Lee of Utah is the first elected official I've run across in the last several years of doing this. Additionally, Bryan Leach is the CEO of a startup, another first in my review of Supreme Court clerks.

Public interest as government work. Usually, there are a couple clerks in a more policy-oriented public interest position, but this year it's pretty much limited to AUSAs, with an SG and a DAG thrown in for good measure.

Where are they now? Supreme Court clerks, OT2005

Following up on posts on a ten-year retrospective on the Supreme Court clerks from October Term 2003 and October Term 2004, here's what the clerks from October Term 2005 are doing. This list is probably unreliable and has not been fact-checked in any way, except for the links provided (and these links often aren't the best source material). Note that Chief Justice William Rehnquist passed away at the beginning of the term and was replaced by Chief Justice John Roberts, and clerks for both are designated under the Roberts clerks. Also note that Justice Samuel Alito replaced Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in the middle of the term, and I did the best I could breaking down their clerks.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts

Daniel P. Kearney, Jr. (Yale 2004 / J. Roberts (D.C. Cir.)), counsel at WilmerHale

Mark W. Mosier (Chicago 2004 / Rehnquist / Tacha), partner at Covington

Ann E. O'Connell (George Washington 2004 / Rehnquist / Magill), assistant to the Solicitor General, DOJ

Michael S. Passaportis (Virginia 2004 / Rehnquist / Wilkinson), unknown

Kosta Stojilkovic (Virginia 2004 / J. Roberts (D.C. Cir.)), AUSA, E.D. Va.

Justice John Paul Stevens

Jean Galbraith (Berkeley 2004 / Tatel), professor at Penn

Daniel J. Lenerz (Stanford 2002 / S. Williams / Thompson (M.D. Ala.)), civil division, appellate staff, DOJ

Sarah Eddy McCallum (Georgetown 2002 / Walker (2d Cir.) / Rakoff), AUSA, S.D.N.Y.

Samuel Spital (Harvard 2004 / H. Edwards), partner at Holland & Knight

Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

Tali Farhadian Weinstein (Yale 2003 / Garland), AUSA, E.D.N.Y.*

Benjamin J. Horwich (Stanford 2003 / Becker / V. Walker (N.D. Cal.)), attorney at Munger Tolles**

Amy N. Kapczynski (Yale 2003 / Calabresi), professor at Yale

Sasha Volokh (Harvard 2004 / Kozinski), professor at Emory**

*Also clerked for previous term with Justice O'Connor.

**Also clerked for Justice Alito upon his confirmation.

Justice Antonin Scalia

John C. Demers (Harvard 1999 / O'Scannlain), VP & assistant GC, Boeing

Scott P. Martin (Columbia 2004 / Kozinski), partner at Gibson Dunn

D. John Sauer (Harvard 2004 / Luttig), partner at Clark & Sauer

Evan A. Young (Yale 2004 / Wilkinson), partner at Baker Botts

Justice Anthony Kennedy

David M. Cooper (Stanford 2004 / J. Roberts (D.C. Cir.)), counsel at Quinn Emanuel

Randy J. Kozel (Harvard 2004 / Kozinski), professor at Notre Dame

Jeffrey A. Pojanowski (Harvard 2004 / J. Roberts (D.C. Cir.)), professor at Notre Dame

Zachary S. Price (Harvard 2003 / Tatel / Blake (D. Md.)), professor at Hastings

Justice David H. Souter

Jeanne C. Fromer (Harvard 2002 / Sack), professor at NYU

Meaghan McLaine VerGow (Harvard 2004 / Garland), counsel at O'Melveny

Jon D. Michaels (Yale 2003 / Calabresi), professor at UCLA

Allison Orr Larsen (Virginia 2004 / Wilkinson), professor at William & Mary

Justice Clarence Thomas

Chantel Febus (George Washington 2002 / E. Jones / Lamberth (D.D.C.)), counsel at Proskauer

James C. Ho (Chicago 1999 / J. Smith (5th Cir.)), partner at Gibson Dunn

John M. Hughes (Chicago 2004 / Luttig), partner at Bartlit Beck

Ashley E. Johnson (Vanderbilt 2004 / Luttig), counsel at Gibson Dunn

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Lori Alvino McGill (Columbia 2003 / Tatel), partner at Quinn Emanuel

Joshua Civin (Yale 2003 / Reinhardt), counsel,  Montgomery County Public Schools

Rebecca Deutsch (Yale 2002 / Katzmann / Rakoff (S.D.N.Y.)), assistant general counsel for law and policy, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Anna-Rose Mathieson (Michigan 2003 / Boudin), partner at California Appellate Law Group

Justice Stephen Breyer

Danielle Gray (Harvard 2003 / Garland), partner at O'Melveny

Kathryn E. Judge (Stanford 2004 / Posner), professor at Columbia

Jonathan Kravis (Yale 2004 / Garland), AUSA, D.D.C.

John H. Longwell (Georgia 1999 / D. Ginsburg / V. Walker (N.D. Cal.)), counsel, ING

Justice Samuel Alito

Adam G. Ciongoli (Georgetown 1995 / Tatel / Bea), counsel, Campbell Soup Company

Horwich (from O'Connor)

Hannah Clayson Smith (BYU 2001 / Thomas (S. Ct.) / Alito (3d Cir.)), counsel, The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Volokh (from O'Connor)

A few thoughts:

The law professor drought is over! Well, last year, I wondered about a sharp drop-off in academic placements, from 14 for OT2003 to just 3 for OT2004. They're back! Nine are teaching at top flight law schools.

Who needs to become a partner? I count 6 former clerks working at law firms in an attorney or counsel role rather than as partner.

Otherwise, it's the usual mix of government or public interest lawyers, private practitioners, and academics one might otherwise expect.

Where are they now? Supreme Court clerks, OT2004

Following up on last year's post on a ten-year retrospective on the Supreme Court clerks from October Term 2003, here's what the clerks from October Term 2004 are doing. This list is probably unreliable and has not been fact-checked in any way, except for the links provided (and these links often aren't the best source material).

Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist

Jeffrey L. Oldham (Northwestern 2003 / Posner), partner at Bracewell & Giuliani

Julius N. Richardson (Chicago 2003 / Posner), AUSA, D.S.C.

Ryan A. Shores (Virginia 2003 / Ripple), partner at Hunton & Williams

Justice John Paul Stevens

Melissa Arbus Sherry (Virginia 2003 / Motz), assistant to the Solicitor General, DOJ

Roberto J. Gonzalez (Stanford 2003 / Calabresi), Principal Deputy General Counsel, CFPB

Michael J. Gottlieb (Harvard 2003 / Reinhardt), partner at Boies Schiller

Daniel J. Powell (Chicago 2003 / W. Fletcher), deputy legal affairs secretary, Office of the Governor of California

Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

Joel C. Beauvais (NYU 2002 / H. Edwards), Associate Administrator, Office of Policy, EPA

Theane D. Evangelis (NYU 2003 / Kozinski), partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher

Tali Farhadian Weinstein (Yale 2003 / Garland), AUSA, E.D.N.Y.

Joshua Klein (Stanford 2002 / Garland), AUSA, C.D. Cal.

Justice Antonin Scalia

Curtis E. Gannon (Chicago 1998 / E. Jones), assistant to the Solicitor General, DOJ

William M. Jay (Harvard 2001 / O'Scannlain), partner at Goodwin Procter

Tara S. Kole (Harvard 2003 / Kozinski), partner at Gang, Tyre, Ramer & Brown

Jake Phillips (Chicago 2003 / Luttig), chief counsel, Boeing

Justice Anthony Kennedy

Andrew C. Baak (Chicago 2003 / Posner), partner at Bartlit Beck

Kathryn R. Haun (Stanford 2000 / Kozinski), AUSA, N.D. Cal.

Michael E. Scoville (Harvard 2003 / Luttig), partner at Perkins Coie

Matthew C. Stephenson (Harvard 2003 / S. Williams), professor at Harvard

Justice David H. Souter

Catherine M.A. Carroll (Michigan 2002 / H. Edwards), partner at WilmerHale

Matthew S. Hellman (Harvard 2002 / Boudin), partner at Jenner & Block

Christine B. Van Aken (NYU 2002 / Leval), deputy city attorney, San Francisco

Daniel S. Volchok (Harvard 2003 / Tatel), partner at WilmerHale

Justice Clarence Thomas

Jennifer Hardy (Yale 2003 / Garza), counsel at Kirkland & Ellis

Martha M. Pacold (Chicago 2002 / Bybee / Randolph), partner at Bartlit Beck

Jeffrey B. Wall (Chicago 2003 / Wilkinson), special counsel at Sullivan & Cromwell

Henry C. Whitaker (Harvard 2003 / Sentelle), Civil Division, DOJ

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ginger D. Anders (Columbia 2002 / Sotomayor / G. Lynch), assistant to the Solicitor General, DOJ

Katherine H. Ku (UCLA 2003 / Kozinski), partner at Munger, Tolles & Olson

Daniel B. Levin (Yale 2002 / W. Fletcher), partner at Munger, Tolles & Olson

Dorothy Hien Tran (Harvard 2003 / Tatel), director of global advocacy, Landesa

Justice Stephen Breyer

Christina Duffy Ponsa (Yale 1998 / Cabranes), professor at Columbia

James P. Dowden (Boston College 2000 / Scirica), partner at Ropes & Gray

Aimee A. Feinberg (Stanford 2002 / Tatel), director, California Supreme Court Clinic, UC Davis

Jake Sullivan (Yale 2003 / Calabresi), national security advisor to the Vice President

A few thoughts:

Unlike the October term 2003 class, there's not quite the clear divide upon roles for clerks to "conservative" (Rehnquist, O'Connor, Kennedy, Scalia, Thomas) and "liberal" (Stevens, Souter, Ginsburg, Breyer) justices. (These are, of course, imperfect terms.) That gives us 35 clerks, 19 clerking for "conservative" justices and 16 for "liberal" justices.

For those still in private practice, 11 are from "conservative" justices (same as last year), and 7 from "liberal" justices (up from 3), good for 18 placements.

For academia, the interest is down dramatically from the 14 placements last year--there are just 3 in academia from OT2004: two from Breyer, one from Kennedy, two of them at Ivies.

In government/public interest, the total is 7 from "conservatives" (up from 3) and 7 from "liberals" (up from 4).

Is there an inertia to clerk classes? Is there a reason that government employees basically doubled between the OT2003 and OT2004 classes, while those entering academia plummeted 80%? Is comparing anecdata for two years' sets of clerks worth much more than a few minutes of baseless Internet speculation? Rest easy--it is certainly little more than that.

New phrase in hiring SCOTUS clerks: the "Full Kagan"

Following "The Elect" is a hobby of many, including, on occasion, me. And we have something new to report.

As far as I can tell from a reading of this Wikipedia page, this is one of the rare times in Supreme Court history that a justice has selected all four of her clerks from the D.C. Circuit--and the first time a justice has selected four D.C. Circuit clerks from four different D.C. Circuit judges.

Other justices have hired all their clerks from the D.C. Circuit before (consider some terms for Justice Brennan), but never when they hired four clerks.

And others have hired three D.C. Circuit clerks before (consider Justice White's October Term 1978, or Thurgood Marshall's October Term 1987).

Still others have hired four clerks from the D.C. Circuit before, but multiple came from the same judge. Justice O'Connor hired four from the D.C. Circuit in October Term 1983 (J. Skelly Wright x2, R.B. Ginsburg, Bork). Justice Scalia brought all of his clerks from the D.C. Circuit with him in 1986, which isn't quite the same. But he also had four D.C. Circuit clerks in October Term 1988 (S. Williams x3,  Bork), not counting an additional D.C. Circuit clerk he shared with Justice Burger.

Last year, three of Justice Kagan's four clerks came from District of Columbia Circuit clerkships (Garland x2, Rogers), the fourth coming from the Tenth Circuit (Gorsuch).

But this year, according to Above the Law, it would be the first time that Supreme Court justice hired four clerks from the D.C. Circuit, from four different justices. Justice Kagan has selected a Kavanaugh, a Srinivasan, a Tatel, and a Garland clerk for October Term 2014.

In homage of the "Full Ginsburg," I thought I'd call this move the "Full Kagan." Sure, it's not "full" in the sense that she's selected a clerk from every D.C. Circuit judge, but it's close enough for the phrase to work.

Now a justice that selected four D.C. Circuit clerks from four different judges appointed by four different presidents... that's for another day (but, perhaps, the "Full Kagan, Squared"?).

I welcome factual corrections if it turns out Justice Kagan is not the first to have performed this maneuver. But even then, I still think naming the hiring cycle after her would work nicely.

Where are they now? Supreme Court clerks, OT2003

Who isn't fascinated with any story about Supreme Court clerks, "The Elect"?

Several years ago, David Lat followed up on the lives of Supreme Court clerks a few years removed from their clerkships. I thought a ten-year retrospective examining where clerks have gone might be of interest. His caveats then are as true as mine are today: this list is probably unreliable and has not been fact-checked in any way, except for the links provided (and these links often aren't the best source material).

Without further ado, the clerks from the Supreme Court, October Term 2003:

Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist

Leon F. DeJulius (Notre Dame 2002 / O’Scannlain), partner at Jones Day

Courtney Gilligan Saleski (George Washington 2002 / Magill), partner at DLA Piper

Aaron M. Streett (Texas 2002 / Sentelle), partner at Baker Botts

Justice John Paul Stevens

Leondra R. Kruger (Yale 2001 / Tatel), Acting Principal Deputy Solicitor General, DOJ

Amanda C. Leiter (Harvard 2000 / Tatel / Gertner (D. Mass.)), professor at American

Margaret H. Lemos (NYU 2001 / Lipez), professor at Duke

Benjamin C. Mizer (Michigan 2002 / J. Rogers), counsel in the Office of Legal Counsel, DOJ

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor

Janet R. Carter (NYU 2001 / Posner), counsel at WilmerHale

Sean C. Grimsley (Michigan 2000 / H. Edwards), partner at Bartlit Beck

RonNell A. Jones (Ohio State 2000 / W. Fletcher), professor at BYU

Sambhav N. Sankar (Berkeley 2000 / W. Fletcher / L. Pollak (E.D. Pa.)), counsel at GE

Justice Antonin Scalia

Benjamin L. Hatch (Harvard 2002 / Luttig), AUSA, EDVA

C. Scott Hemphill (Stanford 2001 / Posner), professor at Columbia

Robert K. Kry (Yale 2002 / Kozinski), partner at MoloLamken LLP

Kevin C. Walsh (Harvard 2002 / Niemeyer), professor at Richmond

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy

Bertrand-Marc Allen (Yale 2002 / Luttig), President, Boeing China

Edward C. Dawson (Texas 2002 / Carnes), fellow at LSU

Orin Kerr (Harvard 1997 / Garth), professor at George Washington

Chi T. Steve Kwok (Yale 2002 / Kozinski), AUSA, SDNY

Justice David H. Souter

Julian D. Mortenson (Stanford 2002 / Wilkinson), professor at Michigan

Samuel J. Rascoff (Yale 2001 / Leval), professor at NYU

Jeannie C. Suk (Harvard 2002 / H. Edwards), professor at Harvard

Gregory G. Rapawy (Harvard 2001 / Lynch), partner at Kellogg Huber

Justice Clarence Thomas

Richard M. Corn (Chicago 2002 / Luttig), associate at Proskauer

John A. Eisenberg (Yale 2002 / Luttig), partner at Kirkland & Ellis

Diane L. McGimsey (Berkeley 2002 / Wilkinson), partner at Sullivan & Cromwell

Hannah Clayson Smith (BYU 2001 / Alito), counsel at The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Abbe R. Gluck (Yale 2000 / R. Winter), professor at Yale

Aziz Z. Huq (Columbia 2001 / Sack), professor at Chicago

Anne Joseph O’Connell (Yale 2000 / S. Williams), professor at Berkeley

Neil S. Siegel (Berkeley 2001 / Wilkinson), professor at Duke

Justice Stephen Breyer

Ariela M. Migdal (NYU 2001 / H. Edwards), counsel at the ACLU

Pratik Shah (Berkeley 2001 / W. Fletcher), assistant to the Solicitor General, DOJ

Alexandra M. Walsh (Stanford 2001 / Garland), partner at Paul Weiss

Davis J. Wang (Harvard 2002 / Boudin), partner at Sullivan & Cromwell

A few thoughts: 

Suppose we divide these justices among "conservative" (Rehnquist, O'Connor, Kennedy, Scalia, Thomas) and "liberal" (Stevens, Souter, Ginsburg, Breyer). (These are, of course, imperfect terms.) Suppose we further divide the clerks into three practice areas: private practice, academia, and government/public interest.

That gives us 35 clerks, 19 clerking for "conservative" justices and 16 for "liberal justices."

In private practice, the decisive edge goes to clerks to "conservative" justices, with 11 to just 3 of the clerks to "liberal justices." Chief Justice Rehnquist (3 for 3) and Justice Thomas (3 for 4) clerks lead the way. 

For academia, an outright majority of clerks to "liberal" justices took that route (9 of 16), compared to just 5 for the clerks to "conservative" justices. Justice Ginsburg's clerks lead the way: not only did 4 for 4 enter academia, but all 4 are teaching at so-called "top 14" schools.  The same "top 14" standard holds true for the 3 former clerks to Justice Souter, too.

In government or public interest, it's 4 for clerks to "liberal" justices, 3 for clerks to "conservative" justices. 

Obviously, this anecdata for a single year's set of clerks is not worth much of anything except, perhaps, confirmation bias, rampant extrapolation, and so on. But isn't that what the Internet makes so amusing, even when meaningless?